Tobacco Intervention Strategies

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The tobacco intervention strategies are described separately below. Each of these strategies is most effective when it is combined with other strategies. For example, changing knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs will do little to prevent or decrease tobacco use if there are no age restrictions enforced for the purchase of tobacco products. Similarly, changing knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs will not be as effective if there is not social support for living tobacco-free.

As described in Readiness and Preparation, it is important to make sure that the intervention strategies are created to represent and address the needs of the Population. This may include paying attention to how different groups think about tobacco use (e.g., preferences for different types of tobacco use may exist for men and women or children and adults). Furthermore, an intervention works best when there is an attempt to address language, reading level, and cultural barriers (see Cultural Competence for more information).


Select one of the following intervention strategies

The purpose of your intervention is to change…

infoBehavior

infoKnowledge, attitudes, skills, and beliefs

infoSocial support

infoEnvironments and policies

infoCampaigns & Promotions

C

E

E

I

infoIndividual Education

I

E

E

I

infoGroup Education

E

E

E

I

infoSupportive Relationships

C

C

C

I

infoProvider Education

C

C

C

I

infoEnvironment & Policies

E

C

C

C

E = evidence supports the effectiveness of this strategy
C = evidence supports use of this strategy in combination with other strategies
I = insufficient evidence to make a recommendation

Select a strategy to learn how to develop an intervention using the strategy.
Or go to one of the following:

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